Synagogues of Venice

The synagogues of Venice are the Jewish places of worship located in the ghetto of Venice.
Some of the five synagogues can be visited thanks to guided tours of the Jewish Museum of Venice.

The synagogues regularly open to the rite are alternatively the two Sephardic ones: in the cold period the Levantina is active and in the hot period the Spanish one.

Scola Grande Tedesca

Temple of ashkenazite rite, its construction began in 1527-28. It was then entirely renovated in late Baroque style in the 1700s. The school has a trapezoidal shape that makes it unique compared to other synagogues of rectangular shape.
The Scola is on the top floor of a building in Campo Ghetto Novo, opposite the Israeli Rest Home is distinguishable by the five windows and two written in Hebrew above them.
The Scuola Grande Tedesca can be visited thanks to the guided tours of the Jewish Museum of Venice.

Scola Canton

The building of the Scola Canton seen from the Campo del Ghetto Novo. In the center you can see the portion of the synagogue that houses the Bimah. The domed skylight illuminates the pulpit from above
This was the first school in Venice to have Aron Ha-Kodesh and bimah in the opposite position. The counters for the faithful are positioned along the long sides of the room. The Scola Canton is considered unique in Europe for eight panels with wooden bas-reliefs depicting biblical events: the city of Jericho, the passage of the Red Sea, the altar of sacrifices, the manna, the Ark on the banks of the Jordan, Korak, the gift of the Torah and Moses as he lets water out of the rock.
The Scola Canton can be visited thanks to guided tours of the Jewish Museum of Venice.

Scola Italiana

Set up in 1575 by the community of Italian origin (the poorest in the ghetto), it is also located in Campo Ghetto Novo, a little to the right of the Canton school. Of all the synagogues in the ghetto, it is the simplest. The Italian school was very important because it housed the sermons of the famous rabbi Leone Modena. Particularity: the entrance of the synagogue is in common with that of some private houses located under the school.

Scola Levantina

Probably built around 1541, it overlooks the campiello delle scole in the Ghetto Vecchio and is the first Sephardic synagogue in Venice.
This synagogue is still active for the ritual in the cold months. In the months when it is not active for worship, it can be visited thanks to the guided tours of the Jewish Museum of Venice.

Scola Ponentina or Spagnola

Founded in 1581 by the Sephardic community of Spanish and Portuguese origin, expelled from Spain in 1492, it is the largest of the Venetian synagogues. Situated in front of the Scola Levantina, it is recognisable by its windows with coloured glass and a large wooden door.
Rebuilt in the 1600s and restored in the 1800s, it is still used for worship in spring and summer. In the months when it is not active for worship is visitable thanks to guided tours of the Jewish Museum of Venice.

For more info (address, timetables, prices, reservation) here’s the link to the official website: http://www.museoebraico.it/le-sinagoghe/